Brave Hikers Rescue Stranded Wild Horse Trapped in Muddy Pit

A heartwarming rescue mission unfolded in southern Alberta when a group of compassionate hikers encountered a young wild horse trapped in a difficult situation.

When they came across the distressed filly, the Help Alberta Wildies Society (HAWS) members were searching for new foals near Sundre, Alberta. The poor creature was stuck in a deep muddy bog, surrounded by ice, and was struggling in vain to free itself.

Watch the video at the end.

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The situation looked dire, but the timely arrival of the HAWS team made all the difference. Darrell Glover, one of the rescuers, stated that if they hadn’t arrived when they did, the horse might not have survived the night.

The filly seemed to be around two years old and had been left behind by her herd, leaving her abandoned and alone for some time.

With great determination and care, the group spent nearly an hour working together to devise a rescue plan. They used ropes attached to their ATVs, carefully securing them around and under the filly’s body, then slowly and gently pulling her out of the treacherous pit.

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The rescue team noticed that the horse was visibly exhausted and extremely hungry. Having endured her difficult ordeal, the filly had nibbled on every bit of grass, weeds, or anything edible within her reach.

However, despite her dire situation, she showed remarkable trust in her rescuers. After being freed from the muddy trap, instead of fleeing, she started grazing peacefully, seemingly appreciative of the help she received.

Glover expressed optimism about the filly’s future, stating that although she might not reunite with her old herd, she will likely find companionship with a bachelor stallion. The hikers believe she will eventually adapt and thrive in her new circumstances.

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This heartwarming story is a testament to the power of compassion and teamwork, showcasing how caring individuals can make a life-saving difference for a vulnerable animal in need.

Watch the video below:

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