Gorilla Exhibits Human-Like Motherly Care for Newborn

Motherhood is a profound experience that transcends boundaries and species. While we often marvel at the love and dedication of human mothers, the animal kingdom has its share of incredible and loving maternal examples.

One such remarkable instance can be witnessed in a heartwarming video featuring a gorilla displaying tender care for her newborn, reminiscent of how humans nurture their infants.

Watch the video at the end.

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Gorillas, as fascinating creatures, share a surprising genetic similarity to humans. According to Chris Tyler-Smith, a renowned geneticist at Wellcome Trust, our genetic sequences are approximately 98 percent identical to those of gorillas.

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This closeness extends beyond the genetic level, as gorilla mothers exhibit human-like traits when raising their young.

Gorilla mothers form strong bonds with their offspring and provide them with essential care during their early years. Like human mothers, they offer shelter, food, protection, and abundant love.

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Often seen in documentaries and photos, gorilla mothers carry their infants on their backs or against their chests, taking them wherever they go.

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A touching video captured hearts two years ago and amassed 14 million views. Uploaded by Reproduction Live TV at the Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, DC, the video features Calaya, a western lowland gorilla, giving birth unassisted to her first male offspring.

The sight is a reminder of the challenges all mothers face during childbirth and the immediate transition into nurturing mode.

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The video showcases the natural instincts of Calaya as she lovingly cares for her newborn, mirroring the dedication and tenderness often seen in human mothers.

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Witnessing such a heartwarming display of motherly affection reminds us that the bonds of love and care transcend species, uniting all mothers in their devotion to their children.

Watch the video below:

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