Rare Birth Marks First Wild Bison Arrival in England in Millennia: Conservationists Celebrate New Arrival

In an astonishing turn of events, a significant milestone was achieved in England’s conservation efforts.

Just months after introducing a small bison herd to Kent, England, the nation celebrated the birth of the first wild bison in nearly 6,000 years. This historic event has brought immense joy to conservationists and nature enthusiasts alike.

Watch the video at the end.

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The Wild Blean project near Canterbury released these bison into their natural habitat in July.

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Little did they know that they were in for a remarkable surprise – one of the bison was pregnant, marking a historic moment in the UK’s conservation history.

Mark Hubben, the project director, couldn’t contain his excitement. He described the experience as an incredible moment of joy and delight.

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The team had always hoped that the bison would multiply, but the speed at which it happened was genuinely unexpected.

Tom Gibbs, a bison ranger, expressed his astonishment, stating, “We always hoped the bison would multiply, but we didn’t expect it to happen so quickly.”

The Kent Wildlife Trust, also known as Wildwood Trust, made the incredible discovery on September 9 but decided not to immediately announce the birth, allowing the calf and its mother to bond and thrive in their natural habitat.

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The bison calf has been thriving, even enjoying playful moments in the rain and mimicking the typical behavior of its herd.

While the aim is to keep human intervention to a minimum, the welfare of these wild animals remains a top priority for the dedicated rangers.

Tom Gibbs has already formulated a comprehensive plan to ensure the best possible care for the calves while maintaining minimal disruption to their wild environment.

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The introduction of bison, alongside Exmoor ponies and Iron Age pigs, to the 120-hectare Blin site is part of a broader conservation effort.

The hope is that these additions will help restore the forest to a green, thriving, and species-rich habitat, rejuvenating the natural landscape.

This historic birth marks a significant step forward in England’s ongoing commitment to conservation and restoring its natural heritage.

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