Young Elephant Man Jai Learns Social Skills at Melbourne with the Help of His Elephant Family

Melbourne Zoo’s youngest bull elephant, 7-year-old Man Jai, is undergoing a crucial learning experience as the zoo’s elephant family reunites to help him understand how to behave around female elephants.

Man Jai is learning valuable lessons from 11-year-old Luk Chai, who enthusiastically welcomed his fellow elephants upon his arrival at the zoo. The heartwarming reunion included affectionate trunk squeezes, ear flapping, and trumpeting.

This unique opportunity allows Man Jai to observe and learn from Luk Chai’s interactions with the female elephants at the zoo.

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In the tightly-knit female group, the elephants move cohesively, while young Man Jai and breeding bull Luk Chai typically walk independently.

Asian elephants, once widespread, have seen their habitats shrink due to human activities, such as palm oil production.

The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) reports that habitat loss and fragmentation are major threats to the species. Additionally, population growth in Asia has led to human encroachment on elephant territories.

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The risk of extinction for these majestic creatures is growing as their populations decline. Poaching remains a significant threat, despite the ban on the ivory trade. Illegal international trade persists in some areas.

Melbourne Zoo participates in a regional Asian elephant breeding program, as the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Red Book lists these animals as endangered. The zoo’s efforts in protecting and educating these elephants are commendable and deserve recognition.

Ultimately, Luk Chai and Man Jai are vital in the Melbourne Zoo’s elephant family and conservation efforts.

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